Summary Notes of Article:

There’s no Big Data without intelligent interface
PATRICIO DAVILA, SARA DIAMOND AND STEVE SZIGETICONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL – PUBLISHED AUGUST 22, 2016UPDATED MAY 16, 2018


  • We can describe data as one of the remarkable new materials of the 21st century – as important to our future as water.

  • Data are measurements of other things: physical phenomena (such as weather patterns) or virtual phenomena (such as telecommunications packets). Every time we search for an online movie, view a video on our mobile device, tweet a comment about a news article, upload a photo to Instagram or are directed to a new location in Pokemon Go, we are producing and responding to data.

  • Discoverability, the ability to find what we want through harnessing our data traces, has redefined distribution. Similarly, it is through data analytics that personalized advertisements appear adjacent to or are embedded in our online experiences.

  • Through design thinking and foresight, we can use qualitative and ethnographic knowledge to bring human factors and needs into dialogue with the artificial intelligence and machine learning that drives data analytics.

  • We need to make informed choices about which decisions can and should be automated through the intelligent systems that are able to analyze and act on data faster than human intervention.
    • system comment by John Deacon CyberKinesis.comAll the examples described above require elegant, meaningful and navigable sensory interfaces.

  • visual analytics refers to tools or systems that are interactive and allow users to upload their own data sets.

  • Here’s the challenge: For humans, data are meaningless without curation, interpretation and representation.

  • Our ability to produce, monitor and manage our personal data, sometimes described as “the quantified self,” will increasingly intersect with our health and insurance data.

  • Adjacent to the visual are emerging creative, applied and inclusive design practices in data “representation,” whether it’s data sculpture (such as 3-D printing, moulding and representation in all physical media of data), tangible computing (wearables or systems that manage data through tactile interfaces) or data sonification (yes, data can make beautiful music).

  • OCAD University faculty, researchers and students are among those exploring data visualization’s potential to provide meaningful interfaces among data, databases, machines and humans.

  • However, we need to remember that science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines are not enough. We need to ensure that we graduate individuals with interpretive and communication skills into the world of Big Data.
    • INTERPRETIVE AND COMMUNICATION CORE ALIGNMENT MODEL CRITICAL POINT FOCUS CAM CAUSE FOR FLOW OF DESIGN THINKING TO ACTION comment byJohn Deacon CyberKinesis.com

  • We are beginning to ensure that students in our fields acquire data-literacy skills – numeracy, statistics, analysis and relevant design – as a baseline.

  • contextual, historical and critical engagement with data, as a material and as a phenomenon

  • We have moved from an era of concern about digital access and literacy to what should be a concern about data access and literacy.

Annotated link: https://diigo.com/0ebsex